Indigenous Transport of Jamnagar

jamnagar (7)
first look Jamnagar

Jamnagar

As we entered the reliance inspired town, our travel owes apart.

One thing I learnt from Neomi Duguid is not apologize for making conversation with the people on the street.

One interesting mode of transport I saw was the Chakda  It reminded me so much of the various mythological stories we hear about the Gods  like Ganesha who get their head chopped off and replaced by another animal. The vehicle looked really incongruous, as if someone had sliced the motorcycle in to half and attached a carrier to it, something in wanted to yell, “stop torturing the bike” like we respond to the tangawalla’s or Calcutta or the Victoria’s of Mumbai.

jamnagar (6)
Locally manufactured auto rickshaws which is a six-seater

These vehicles could transport up to eight people or if it was goods carrier then it functioned like a small truck. What the local’s told me was using these to transport small goods for definitely more economically, more over most of these vehicles were owned by the driver unlike trucks and tempo’s which were owned by someone else and the driver was just a paid employee. I do not know how that works in the economic ecology but that seems to be an import consideration.

Then there were auto rickshaw’s that are manufactured indigenous at Jamnagar, as a small industry.  The auto that we were in was a Bajaj, rear engine our auto driver pointed out these to us and told us, very proudly that those were locally made in Jamnagar and he was planning to buy one soon. Again here the attitude is using this vehicle instead of a Bajaj or the other one I forgotten the company name meant money stayed in Jamnagar instead of going out.

jamnagar (5)
the chakada– a motorcycle morphed as a goods transporter here.

Despite of the fact that the fares were not regulated and public transport swindled the visitors it was amazing to see to the sense of pride and innovation.

 

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parwatisingari

full time mother and role play at being, dentist,dramatist, dancer, dreamer

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